I’m constantly amazed by the level of creative ability coming from this fandom. Thank you for sharing your talent mycolour.

I’m constantly amazed by the level of creative ability coming from this fandom. Thank you for sharing your talent mycolour.

Check out the first installment of the SleepyCast, the official Sleepy Hollow podcast in partnership with Nerdist.com.

They’ll be recapping Season 1 for the next month until the premiere of Season 2 on September 22. 

Hope you like it.

ICYMI - I wanted to share/reblog the song and video I was inspired to write after the Jordan Davis verdict this past February. Thanks for giving it a listen and sharing your thoughts.

theorlandojones:

Orlando Jones (Star Of Fox’s Hit TV Show Sleepy Hollow) Releases His First Music Video “Thug Music Vol. 1- Play At A Maximum Level”

Inspired By Recent Events, Orlando Jones Tackles A New Medium To Weave A Musical & Visual Narrative In The Quest To Encourage Dialogue & Debate

Fun Fact: Kanye West, Maroon Five and David Banner all made their television debuts on the Orlando Jones Show on FX in the early 2000s.  His love of music and eye for launching new talent may not be surprising, but audiences will be surprised to learn that he is a prolific singer in his own right who is dropping a unique new music video. Although he’s known to many audiences as a comedic talent, Jones has in fact worked in every facet and genre of the filmed entertainment business for nearly two decades. He began his career as a teenaged comedy writer on one of the most popular shows in TV history, Cosby Show spin-off A Different World.

After working on the pilot to Fox’s hit show Martin (starring Martin Lawrence) Jones put his writing career on hold and relocated to New York to launch the new cable channel FX. His range of responsibilities included hosting SoundFX, a daily live music show where he interviewed renowned musical acts including Nirvana, Flaming Lips, Arrested Development and many others.

One year later Orlando would return to Los Angeles to join the cast of MadTV. His unique trajectory from comedy writer, to television host, to playing an integral part in launching a 14 year long sketch comedy franchise for a major network cemented his role as a multi-faceted talent and drew the attention of major filmmakers. After his second season on MadTV, Orlando was cast in a starring role in Liberty Heights from Academy Award winning director Barry Levinson.

Orlando quickly established himself as a formidable dramatic actor following up his role in Liberty Heights opposite Academy Award winner Adrien Brody with a part in Paul Thomas Anderson’s tour de force Magnolia. He continued to pursue a wide range of comedic and dramatic film roles in a string of successful films which remain a staple on cable television including the football classic the Replacements, Double Take with Eddie Griffin, Biker Boyz, Office Space, Evolution, Time Machine and Drumline. He also remained active in television with countless guest starring roles on beloved television shows including The Ghost Whisperer, House, Girlfriends and more.  Not content as simple a film and television performer, Jones took to Broadway, playing the title role of “The Wiz” opposite Ashanti and Tony Award winner LaChanze. 

Even gamers will recognize Jones’ voice as Marine Sergeant Banks in Halo 2.

Orlando currently splits his time between voicing several characters on Adult Swim’s hit show Black Dynamite, a starring role as Captain Frank Irving in Fox’s massive global hit Sleepy Hollow and recording the soundtrack to his graphic novel style action comedy Tainted Love.

Inspired by recent events that have been resonating deeply throughout the core of society, Orlando is releasing the single Thug Music Vol. 1-Play At A Maximum Level. He’s using his music and accompanying visuals to weave a compelling narrative as a platform for debate, dialogue and engagement to ask—can individuals create a social movement that might actually change the world?    

“I’m a big fan of the Steve Jobs quote that launched Apple’s “Think Different” campaign in 1997” Jones explains. “It says - Here’s to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square hole, the ones who see things differently—- they’re not fond of rules. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things. They push the human race forward and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world—-are the ones who do”. 

Jones relates the quote to the recent deaths of black males in Florida including Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis as well as a range of other miscarriages of justice. “I wonder where young black men like Jordan Davis fit into this conceit. Would he have been “crazy enough” to change the world? Or Trayvon Martin-could he have been part of the movement to “push the human race forward”? Sadly, we’ll never know what might have come from their unrealized potential, not to mention the countless other fallen brothers and sisters whose lives were cut down too soon and for whom justice was not served. What of Renisha McBride and Rekia Boyd? Emmett Till and Medgar Evers? Aiyana Jones and Latasha Harlins” asks Orlando. 

He goes on to add “These individuals changed things. They put a face on the legacy of ‘Unforgivable Blackness’. Contrary to the spirit of Steve Job’s words we continue to ignore them and those like them. You and I see them every day; boys and girls, brothers and sisters, husbands and wives, mothers and fathers. People whose humanity and agency is denied in life and whose memory is tarnished in death to serve a media narrative that their fate might not have befallen them if only they minimized their otherness and didn’t appear ‘too threatening’.”

Jones is careful to point out that he speaks as a private citizen who is deeply troubled by what he believes to be indefensible crimes that are not adequately prosecuted by law enforcement. “I am not a politician. I am not an academic. I have no earthly idea how to create systemic change on a policy level so that people stop dying and get written off as another statistic. However, I do believe in the transformative power of narrative storytelling across a multitude of platforms. Media representations of persons of color matter. How we see ourselves and how others see us represented in popular culture sets the stage for how we will navigate a world where privilege is the Golden Rule—-“Those Who Have The Gold Make The Rules”.

“That’s why I wrote this song, “Thug Music Vol. 1-Play At A Maximum Level” and the forthcoming “Tainted Love” graphic novel— to explore themes of how our culture has been co-opted and appropriated (sometimes with our implicit endorsement) and then spoon-fed back to us (and society at large).

In selecting “Thug Music Vol. 1-Play At A Maximum Level” as the first release of my musical journey, it’s important to point it it’s not intended to be a Top-40 joint. The sound I’m sharing is raw, evolving and from my soul” Orlando opines. “Some of you will (hopefully) feel it and others might not find it to their liking. I welcome any constructive criticism; but I’ll be much more interested in what you have to say if you bring your own creative game to the conversation.” 

In closing, Orlando reiterates “let’s make sure the faces of our fallen aren’t relegated to the dustbin of irrelevancy but instead treated with the same reverence as the faces in that Apple campaign with the quote I am so fond of.  It’s the very least we can do!”

Link To Orlando Jones/GSr “Thug Music Vol. 1- Play At A Maximum Level

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuXI7m1j2FA

Music and lyrics by Orlando Jones and Selvah
female vocals by Lee Anna James and Selvah
Rap provided by CRUMM

This is a new project I’m involved in that marries my love of graphic novels, pop culture and issues that I am passionate about. Hope you are able to check it out when it gets released early next year:

The 5 Powers, narrated by award-winning actor Orlando Jones, tells the story of three superheroes of peace: Thich Nhat Hanh, Vietnamese Zen Master nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1967; Sister Chân Không, Vietnamese Zen master and peace activist; and Alfred Hassler, longtime leader of F.O.R., peace activist, and creator of The Montgomery Story comic book that helped turn Dr. King into a superhero.

"The 5 Powers film is a moving fusion of documentary footage, historic montage and vivid animation that sends a powerful message of peace. Using modern technology and dramatic storytelling, the film focuses on three true heroes and their efforts to promote the non-violent resolution of conflict through a mindful, compassionate approach. It’s beautifully crafted and truly inspiring." - Dave Gibbons (Watchmen, Green Lantern)

More info at - http://www.peaceisthewayfilms.com/mlk-montgomery-story-comic-book-origins/

Many thanks to Professor Nadler and the Ryerson students for hosting me today to discuss transmedia and my graphic novel action comedy “Tainted Love”.

Many thanks to Professor Nadler and the Ryerson students for hosting me today to discuss transmedia and my graphic novel action comedy “Tainted Love”.

This is a very serious disease* so I gladly accept the “bucket challenge”

*My heart goes out to all those who struggle with ALS but I am, of course, talking about the disease of apathy.  If (and hopefully when) Michael Brown’s killer is brought to justice and convicted of 1st degree murder, it still won’t prevent this from happening again. We cannot accept this as the status quo. We MUST continue the fight at the ballot box, in the media and by working to create systemic change. I’m not naive to the dirty politics (redistricting, voter ID requirements, etc) that will try to prevent us from our goal. But I refuse to give up hope. My “bullet bucket challenge” is not about pointing fingers and it’s not about being angry. Every shell casing in that bucket represents the life of someone who fought and died in the goal for civil rights and human dignity. As a member of law enforcement (yes I really am a reserve sheriff) I will not stand idly by while others violate civil and human rights under the cover of authority and I will insist that other good cops rise to the same standard as well. As a black man I will demand more from myself and my community. I will not allow outsiders to co-opt our struggle in order to commit violence in our name. I’m channeling my outrage into action so I no longer feel powerless. It’s not about black or white. It’s not about rich or poor. It’s about us vs. them. There are more of us — from all races, genders and identities — then there will ever be of them. And we will be victorious.

"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality"

Join me.

As we wrap up this terrible week and weekend some final thoughts before I get my black ass back to work tomorrow to fight fictional demons instead of feeling powerless against the real ones —
Although he wasn’t by any means a close personal friend, the death of Robin Williams affected by greatly. Working with him and David Duchovny on the film House of D was a privilege and seeing how he treated everyone he encountered regardless of race, class, gender or orientation remains a hopeful reminder that genuine kindness and empathy does exist in the world. Whatever the ultimate reasons for his decision to take his own life I pray for him, his family and all who suffer from the unrelenting grasp of depression and substance abuse. By shining his light on us all for the period of time he did, I am 100% certain that Robin left this world a better place than he entered it with a legacy that will not soon be forgotten.
That said, if we spent even a fraction of the time given to the tributes about Robin and the late Lauren Bacall also remembering the lives of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, John Crawford, Ezell Ford or Dante Parker (the 5 unarmed black men killed by police just in the past month) or honestly looked at the data about how often police shoot unarmed black men and women in this country we would all hang our collective heads in shame.
In the midst of thousands upon thousands of peaceful protesters who came out demanding answers and marching for justice with the powerful and heartbreaking refrain Hands Up. Don’t Shoot. the actions of a small few in Ferguson (many of whom were anarchists that intentionally came into the city to stir up trouble and perhaps a few others from the community who had simply reached their breaking point in the face of racial, economic and social injustice) gave the white power structure the cover to quickly change the narrative to one about the violence in the city (in reality almost entirely perpetrated by the militarized police rather than the demonstrators) instead of the murder of an unarmed teenager by a cop who “never meant for this to happen" (and don’t even get me started on that fuckery which should instead read "a cop who never meant to be held accountable").
In this way, a PROTEST became a RIOT. Images of demonstrators THROWING BACK tear gas canisters launched at them became stories of rioters throwing molotov cocktails AT THE POLICE (and yes I am aware of media reports showing that molotov cocktails were in fact used by protesters in some instances but not in the way that it was ultimately spun). And the police released incendiary and ENTIRELY IRRELEVANT information about Michael Brown that the media lapped up because it reinforced the all too familiar trope that “the violent black dude was a thug who got what he deserved”.
Black victims are regularly eyed with suspicion and contempt (and ultimately deemed responsible for what happened to them) while the media too often generates headlines that exhibit an air of disbelief at an alleged white killer’s supposed actions.
Even in our outrage at what happened this past week and the necessity for our voices to be heard so this story is not swept under the rug, we all know something like this will happen again. And again. And again.
Until each of us (black, white, brown, etc) demands accountability from our elected officials we will get the country we deserve. Tweeting is not enough. Feeling bad is not enough. Implying that we’re overreacting and it can’t really be that bad (but the president is black tho) makes you an accessory after the fact (not to mention an asshole). 
Which is why, as the GIF above shows, I’m giving America a down vote.
So how can we stop feeling powerless? What can we actually do?
Honestly, there are people much smarter than me who can do a better job of answering that question.
But trying to answer that question for myself is a large part of why I do what I do for a living. Because representation matters. Because being in control of our own stories empowers us to show a wide range of depictions of blackness and “otherness” (shockingly, not only do we not all LOOK ALIKE but we also don’t all THINK ALIKE) that are far more interesting than what we’ve been spoon fed in the past. I’m the first to admit that we’ve still got A LONG WAY TO GO and that’s where you all come in.
Although my engagement in fandom is embraced by some and side-eyed by others, these spaces of interaction may in fact play one of the most significant roles in the future of media and representation as we know it. At the very least it will create a future generation of professional storytellers (and social justice advocates) who were raised in the trenches of Live Journal, Tumblr, ao3 and other platforms currently in use or yet to be created.
I know this is your turf and even though there are times some of you wish I’d go away I genuinely appreciate the opportunity to interact with you here.
Together, we can make a difference.
Trollando out.

As we wrap up this terrible week and weekend some final thoughts before I get my black ass back to work tomorrow to fight fictional demons instead of feeling powerless against the real ones —

Although he wasn’t by any means a close personal friend, the death of Robin Williams affected by greatly. Working with him and David Duchovny on the film House of D was a privilege and seeing how he treated everyone he encountered regardless of race, class, gender or orientation remains a hopeful reminder that genuine kindness and empathy does exist in the world. Whatever the ultimate reasons for his decision to take his own life I pray for him, his family and all who suffer from the unrelenting grasp of depression and substance abuse. By shining his light on us all for the period of time he did, I am 100% certain that Robin left this world a better place than he entered it with a legacy that will not soon be forgotten.

That said, if we spent even a fraction of the time given to the tributes about Robin and the late Lauren Bacall also remembering the lives of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, John Crawford, Ezell Ford or Dante Parker (the 5 unarmed black men killed by police just in the past month) or honestly looked at the data about how often police shoot unarmed black men and women in this country we would all hang our collective heads in shame.

In the midst of thousands upon thousands of peaceful protesters who came out demanding answers and marching for justice with the powerful and heartbreaking refrain Hands Up. Don’t Shoot. the actions of a small few in Ferguson (many of whom were anarchists that intentionally came into the city to stir up trouble and perhaps a few others from the community who had simply reached their breaking point in the face of racial, economic and social injustice) gave the white power structure the cover to quickly change the narrative to one about the violence in the city (in reality almost entirely perpetrated by the militarized police rather than the demonstrators) instead of the murder of an unarmed teenager by a cop who “never meant for this to happen" (and don’t even get me started on that fuckery which should instead read "a cop who never meant to be held accountable").

In this way, a PROTEST became a RIOT. Images of demonstrators THROWING BACK tear gas canisters launched at them became stories of rioters throwing molotov cocktails AT THE POLICE (and yes I am aware of media reports showing that molotov cocktails were in fact used by protesters in some instances but not in the way that it was ultimately spun). And the police released incendiary and ENTIRELY IRRELEVANT information about Michael Brown that the media lapped up because it reinforced the all too familiar trope that “the violent black dude was a thug who got what he deserved”.

Black victims are regularly eyed with suspicion and contempt (and ultimately deemed responsible for what happened to them) while the media too often generates headlines that exhibit an air of disbelief at an alleged white killer’s supposed actions.

Even in our outrage at what happened this past week and the necessity for our voices to be heard so this story is not swept under the rug, we all know something like this will happen again. And again. And again.

Until each of us (black, white, brown, etc) demands accountability from our elected officials we will get the country we deserve. Tweeting is not enough. Feeling bad is not enough. Implying that we’re overreacting and it can’t really be that bad (but the president is black tho) makes you an accessory after the fact (not to mention an asshole). 

Which is why, as the GIF above shows, I’m giving America a down vote.

So how can we stop feeling powerless? What can we actually do?

Honestly, there are people much smarter than me who can do a better job of answering that question.

But trying to answer that question for myself is a large part of why I do what I do for a living. Because representation matters. Because being in control of our own stories empowers us to show a wide range of depictions of blackness and “otherness” (shockingly, not only do we not all LOOK ALIKE but we also don’t all THINK ALIKE) that are far more interesting than what we’ve been spoon fed in the past. I’m the first to admit that we’ve still got A LONG WAY TO GO and that’s where you all come in.

Although my engagement in fandom is embraced by some and side-eyed by others, these spaces of interaction may in fact play one of the most significant roles in the future of media and representation as we know it. At the very least it will create a future generation of professional storytellers (and social justice advocates) who were raised in the trenches of Live Journal, Tumblr, ao3 and other platforms currently in use or yet to be created.

I know this is your turf and even though there are times some of you wish I’d go away I genuinely appreciate the opportunity to interact with you here.

Together, we can make a difference.

Trollando out.

theorlandojones:

I’m hoping Professor Marc Lamont Hill (on the far left) is about to say:
Are we seriously having this fucking conversation right now while Ferguson is basically under martial law?

EDIT: Thanks to the folks who informed me that the above image is from the Trayvon Martin verdict. Given CNN’s shitty reporting throughout the Ferguson situation my comment in the tags still stands.

theorlandojones:

I’m hoping Professor Marc Lamont Hill (on the far left) is about to say:

Are we seriously having this fucking conversation right now while Ferguson is basically under martial law?

EDIT: Thanks to the folks who informed me that the above image is from the Trayvon Martin verdict. Given CNN’s shitty reporting throughout the Ferguson situation my comment in the tags still stands.

I’m hoping Professor Marc Lamont Hill (on the far left) is about to say:
Are we seriously having this fucking conversation right now while Ferguson is basically under martial law?
EDIT: Thanks to the folks who informed me that the above image is from the Trayvon Martin verdict. Given CNN’s shitty reporting throughout the Ferguson situation my comment in the tags still stands.

I’m hoping Professor Marc Lamont Hill (on the far left) is about to say:

Are we seriously having this fucking conversation right now while Ferguson is basically under martial law?

EDIT: Thanks to the folks who informed me that the above image is from the Trayvon Martin verdict. Given CNN’s shitty reporting throughout the Ferguson situation my comment in the tags still stands.

(via upworthy)

In black communities, “to protect and serve” often feels more like “to threaten and subdue.” Law enforcement in the U.S. should be just that — enforcement. What happened to Mike Brown went way beyond that, and it was not an isolated incident.

Policing needs to be less about militarization and more about community relations. And the racial discrimination that creates situations like the one in Ferguson has to stop.

Dangerous as it may be, we’re going to have to keep fighting for it, because the only other choice is to reject what we all know to be right.