Meet the newest clone —
aka Trollando

Meet the newest clone —

aka Trollando

Is Emoticon Fic a thing?

It should totally be a thing.

I got Abbie Mills.

Et tu?

theorlandojones:

My parents drove a white Chevy Monte Carlo with powder blue interior. Technically, this was my mom’s car. I always sat in the middle of the the back seat and leaned forward between the two front bucket seats with my nose firmly planted in what my mom called, “grown folks business.” On this summer day about thirty years ago, I sat back and quietly stared out the window. The road signs zipped past as we raced toward our destination. We arrived at the airport moments later and approached the departure gate (back when you could do that sort of thing). My mother’s demeanor clouded and a monsoon of tears rolled down her face. She squeezed me like a black rubber ducky. I made a high pitched squeal as she pushed all the air from my lungs. My father reluctantly joined in. I heard a low deep voice whisper, “love you boy.” My mother couldn’t speak. I’d only be gone for three weeks. To Mattye Jones this was an eternity.  I boarded the plane first. I was not seated in first class. I was a minor flying alone. I acted like a spotter at the gym following behind the flight attendant as she teetered down the isle in high heels wearing twelve and a half pounds of makeup with a faded gold airplane pendant pinned to her lapel. 
She giggled as she walked and I did my best to catch her when she lost her balance and pulled some escapee from the Real Housewives of Alabama’s wig off. When we arrived at my seat she pursed her lips and asked me, in a voice that sounded a lot like she was talking to a Yorkshire Terrier in a Burberry sweater, “is this your first time flying darling?”  We were early in the boarding process and I had my doubts about her ability to supervise passengers in flight. Yes, I was a child troll. I fastened my seat-belt and responded with a curt, “nope.”  I looked like a little junior mint in a bowl full of marshmallows on this flight. This would be a temporary feeling. 
Soon I’d be in Mobile Alabama spending the summer with three of the four southern belles whose homes I grew up in:  Zeola Ransefore, Dolly Mae Pettus and Daisy Mae Cowan.  These are the women that raised me. These Black women are my heart. They fed me, taught me, reprimanded me and loved me. 
This is my context. I don’t see the world through a strictly Black point of view. These women made damn sure my perspective was not mired by their negative experiences. They chose to focus on the positive. I can never repay them for that. 
Like any normal person, when I watch television and film I look for things that are familiar and unfamiliar. Sometimes, I like to see things that represent where I came from. It pains me to see the women that raised me so grossly under/misrepresented in media. I can’t be alone. 
It is with that mind set that I decided to compile the following list to celebrate just a few of the amazing women who have touched my heart with their work. It’s not a definitive list. It represents many women of color, some women of a certain age that we’ve been lead to believe is less desirable because it falls out of the market tested demographic that we’re meant to covet, women more defined by the content of their character than the color of their skin. But they are women whose work has stood out to me on various television series, in new digital programs that represent the future of storytelling, women who have blazed trails, changed the game and much more. I always try to keep an eye out for their projects when I get the chance.
Thank you ladies. Your amazing work has not gone unnoticed. 
PS - If you have some favorites that I did not include please share your list as well. I’d love to see whose work gets you excited too.

Reblogging with link to a larger version of chart which many have requested. Thanks.
http://i.imgur.com/XuWps7c.jpg

theorlandojones:

My parents drove a white Chevy Monte Carlo with powder blue interior. Technically, this was my mom’s car. I always sat in the middle of the the back seat and leaned forward between the two front bucket seats with my nose firmly planted in what my mom called, “grown folks business.” On this summer day about thirty years ago, I sat back and quietly stared out the window. The road signs zipped past as we raced toward our destination. We arrived at the airport moments later and approached the departure gate (back when you could do that sort of thing). My mother’s demeanor clouded and a monsoon of tears rolled down her face. She squeezed me like a black rubber ducky. I made a high pitched squeal as she pushed all the air from my lungs. My father reluctantly joined in. I heard a low deep voice whisper, “love you boy.” My mother couldn’t speak. I’d only be gone for three weeks. To Mattye Jones this was an eternity.  I boarded the plane first. I was not seated in first class. I was a minor flying alone. I acted like a spotter at the gym following behind the flight attendant as she teetered down the isle in high heels wearing twelve and a half pounds of makeup with a faded gold airplane pendant pinned to her lapel. 

She giggled as she walked and I did my best to catch her when she lost her balance and pulled some escapee from the Real Housewives of Alabama’s wig off. When we arrived at my seat she pursed her lips and asked me, in a voice that sounded a lot like she was talking to a Yorkshire Terrier in a Burberry sweater, “is this your first time flying darling?”  We were early in the boarding process and I had my doubts about her ability to supervise passengers in flight. Yes, I was a child troll. I fastened my seat-belt and responded with a curt, “nope.”  I looked like a little junior mint in a bowl full of marshmallows on this flight. This would be a temporary feeling. 

Soon I’d be in Mobile Alabama spending the summer with three of the four southern belles whose homes I grew up in:  Zeola Ransefore, Dolly Mae Pettus and Daisy Mae Cowan.  These are the women that raised me. These Black women are my heart. They fed me, taught me, reprimanded me and loved me. 

This is my context. I don’t see the world through a strictly Black point of view. These women made damn sure my perspective was not mired by their negative experiences. They chose to focus on the positive. I can never repay them for that. 

Like any normal person, when I watch television and film I look for things that are familiar and unfamiliar. Sometimes, I like to see things that represent where I came from. It pains me to see the women that raised me so grossly under/misrepresented in media. I can’t be alone. 

It is with that mind set that I decided to compile the following list to celebrate just a few of the amazing women who have touched my heart with their work. It’s not a definitive list. It represents many women of color, some women of a certain age that we’ve been lead to believe is less desirable because it falls out of the market tested demographic that we’re meant to covet, women more defined by the content of their character than the color of their skin. But they are women whose work has stood out to me on various television series, in new digital programs that represent the future of storytelling, women who have blazed trails, changed the game and much more. I always try to keep an eye out for their projects when I get the chance.

Thank you ladies. Your amazing work has not gone unnoticed. 

PS - If you have some favorites that I did not include please share your list as well. I’d love to see whose work gets you excited too.

Reblogging with link to a larger version of chart which many have requested. Thanks.

http://i.imgur.com/XuWps7c.jpg

My parents drove a white Chevy Monte Carlo with powder blue interior. Technically, this was my mom’s car. I always sat in the middle of the the back seat and leaned forward between the two front bucket seats with my nose firmly planted in what my mom called, “grown folks business.” On this summer day about thirty years ago, I sat back and quietly stared out the window. The road signs zipped past as we raced toward our destination. We arrived at the airport moments later and approached the departure gate (back when you could do that sort of thing). My mother’s demeanor clouded and a monsoon of tears rolled down her face. She squeezed me like a black rubber ducky. I made a high pitched squeal as she pushed all the air from my lungs. My father reluctantly joined in. I heard a low deep voice whisper, “love you boy.” My mother couldn’t speak. I’d only be gone for three weeks. To Mattye Jones this was an eternity.  I boarded the plane first. I was not seated in first class. I was a minor flying alone. I acted like a spotter at the gym following behind the flight attendant as she teetered down the isle in high heels wearing twelve and a half pounds of makeup with a faded gold airplane pendant pinned to her lapel. 
She giggled as she walked and I did my best to catch her when she lost her balance and pulled some escapee from the Real Housewives of Alabama’s wig off. When we arrived at my seat she pursed her lips and asked me, in a voice that sounded a lot like she was talking to a Yorkshire Terrier in a Burberry sweater, “is this your first time flying darling?”  We were early in the boarding process and I had my doubts about her ability to supervise passengers in flight. Yes, I was a child troll. I fastened my seat-belt and responded with a curt, “nope.”  I looked like a little junior mint in a bowl full of marshmallows on this flight. This would be a temporary feeling. 
Soon I’d be in Mobile Alabama spending the summer with three of the four southern belles whose homes I grew up in:  Zeola Ransefore, Dolly Mae Pettus and Daisy Mae Cowan.  These are the women that raised me. These Black women are my heart. They fed me, taught me, reprimanded me and loved me. 
This is my context. I don’t see the world through a strictly Black point of view. These women made damn sure my perspective was not mired by their negative experiences. They chose to focus on the positive. I can never repay them for that. 
Like any normal person, when I watch television and film I look for things that are familiar and unfamiliar. Sometimes, I like to see things that represent where I came from. It pains me to see the women that raised me so grossly under/misrepresented in media. I can’t be alone. 
It is with that mind set that I decided to compile the following list to celebrate just a few of the amazing women who have touched my heart with their work. It’s not a definitive list. It represents many women of color, some women of a certain age that we’ve been lead to believe is less desirable because it falls out of the market tested demographic that we’re meant to covet, women more defined by the content of their character than the color of their skin. But they are women whose work has stood out to me on various television series, in new digital programs that represent the future of storytelling, women who have blazed trails, changed the game and much more. I always try to keep an eye out for their projects when I get the chance.
Thank you ladies. Your amazing work has not gone unnoticed. 
PS - If you have some favorites that I did not include please share your list as well. I’d love to see whose work gets you excited too.

My parents drove a white Chevy Monte Carlo with powder blue interior. Technically, this was my mom’s car. I always sat in the middle of the the back seat and leaned forward between the two front bucket seats with my nose firmly planted in what my mom called, “grown folks business.” On this summer day about thirty years ago, I sat back and quietly stared out the window. The road signs zipped past as we raced toward our destination. We arrived at the airport moments later and approached the departure gate (back when you could do that sort of thing). My mother’s demeanor clouded and a monsoon of tears rolled down her face. She squeezed me like a black rubber ducky. I made a high pitched squeal as she pushed all the air from my lungs. My father reluctantly joined in. I heard a low deep voice whisper, “love you boy.” My mother couldn’t speak. I’d only be gone for three weeks. To Mattye Jones this was an eternity.  I boarded the plane first. I was not seated in first class. I was a minor flying alone. I acted like a spotter at the gym following behind the flight attendant as she teetered down the isle in high heels wearing twelve and a half pounds of makeup with a faded gold airplane pendant pinned to her lapel. 

She giggled as she walked and I did my best to catch her when she lost her balance and pulled some escapee from the Real Housewives of Alabama’s wig off. When we arrived at my seat she pursed her lips and asked me, in a voice that sounded a lot like she was talking to a Yorkshire Terrier in a Burberry sweater, “is this your first time flying darling?”  We were early in the boarding process and I had my doubts about her ability to supervise passengers in flight. Yes, I was a child troll. I fastened my seat-belt and responded with a curt, “nope.”  I looked like a little junior mint in a bowl full of marshmallows on this flight. This would be a temporary feeling. 

Soon I’d be in Mobile Alabama spending the summer with three of the four southern belles whose homes I grew up in:  Zeola Ransefore, Dolly Mae Pettus and Daisy Mae Cowan.  These are the women that raised me. These Black women are my heart. They fed me, taught me, reprimanded me and loved me. 

This is my context. I don’t see the world through a strictly Black point of view. These women made damn sure my perspective was not mired by their negative experiences. They chose to focus on the positive. I can never repay them for that. 

Like any normal person, when I watch television and film I look for things that are familiar and unfamiliar. Sometimes, I like to see things that represent where I came from. It pains me to see the women that raised me so grossly under/misrepresented in media. I can’t be alone. 

It is with that mind set that I decided to compile the following list to celebrate just a few of the amazing women who have touched my heart with their work. It’s not a definitive list. It represents many women of color, some women of a certain age that we’ve been lead to believe is less desirable because it falls out of the market tested demographic that we’re meant to covet, women more defined by the content of their character than the color of their skin. But they are women whose work has stood out to me on various television series, in new digital programs that represent the future of storytelling, women who have blazed trails, changed the game and much more. I always try to keep an eye out for their projects when I get the chance.

Thank you ladies. Your amazing work has not gone unnoticed. 

PS - If you have some favorites that I did not include please share your list as well. I’d love to see whose work gets you excited too.

Skeptical Third World Child meme be like —

And in summation your honor —
If the shirt don’t fit you… get a different size?
http://mxtz.co/supersleepy

And in summation your honor —

If the shirt don’t fit you… get a different size?

http://mxtz.co/supersleepy

Sick of all the haters and doubters who are all like —
That’s not funny. That’s a messed up AFD joke. F*&k off Trollando.
Um… I have a contract. Therefore it’s a thing. 
Suck it.

Sick of all the haters and doubters who are all like —

That’s not funny. That’s a messed up AFD joke. F*&k off Trollando.

Um… I have a contract. Therefore it’s a thing. 

Suck it.

Since Sleepy Hollow premiered last September, I’ve been on a truly wild ride that has made for one of the most exciting and unexpected professional experiences I’ve ever had as an actor. In addition to witnessing the birth of the Sleepyheads (the amazing fandom that supports our show) I’ve also been adopted by the SPNFamily, the fans that have made the CW cult series Supernatural the success it is today.

Through that experience I had the opportunity to meet and befriend Misha Collins, one of the stars of Supernatural, who has proven himself a force to be reckoned with in the social media realm for his creation of disruptive media experiences that engage fans across the globe in support of his non-profit organization Random Acts.

Collins, recently dubbed the “King of Social Media” by users on the popular site Zap2It.com, was the catalyst for what will become my next creative journey as I’m proud to share news of a new project we’ll be working on together.

I’m still amazed that what started out as a joke I came up with on Twitter has now become a reality.

—————————————————-

MISHA COLLINS AND ORLANDO JONES TO STAR IN HULU ORIGINAL SERIES

SURPRISE SPIN-OFF BORN FROM JOKE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 2, 2014/LOS ANGELES - An unlikely pairing will come to life on popular streaming website Hulu as Supernatural star Misha Collins and Sleepy Hollow fan favorite Orlando Jones join forces in a unique and unexpected limited series. After lengthy negotiations, the OTT (over-the-top) streaming video subscription service, Sleepy Hollow producer 20th Century Fox TV and Supernatural producer Warner Brothers Television have reached a licensing agreement for a spinoff from the two acclaimed drama series. The untitled spinoff series, codenamed SuperSleepy, has been in the works for months. It centers on two of the breakout supporting characters from the respective series, Sleepy Hollow’s Captain Frank Irving (Jones), the by-the-book police captain who was last seen confessing to a murder he did not commit and Supernatural’s Castiel (Collins), an angel who fell from heaven and works along side the Winchester Brothers to protect humanity from the battle between heaven and hell.

Conceived by Supernatural writer/producer Robbie Thompson along with actors Collins and Jones, who inspired the idea with a series of humorous tweets about the proposed series, the spinoff will be a stand-alone 13 episode series that will focus on the relationship between the two characters after Collins character appears in Sleepy Hollow while Jones’ Captain Irving is in an asylum under heavy sedation, Hulu said. None of the parties would elaborate on the project’s status, but we’ve learned “SuperSleepy” has a series order pending the completion of Fox’s deal with Jones and Warner Bros deal with Collins and Thompson. Collins is slated to direct the pilot. The agreement between Hulu, Fox, and WB came after negotiations with Amazon, which has had huge success with Sleepy Hollow, broke down over Amazon’s concern about the project’s special “niche within a niche market appeal”.

The hour-long spinoff is expected to be far less dark than the respective original series with more comedy infused into it.

Sleepy Hollow co-creator Len Wiseman has been high on the idea since Jones first discussed it with him in December. “As a fan of Supernatural I would love to see a SuperSleepy spinoff,” he said at the recent Paleyfest event for Sleepy Hollow at Los Angeles’ Dolby Theater. “I like the idea of a buddy show in which these two breakout characters will do anything it takes to protect mankind from the impending apocalypse while trying to out sass each other. I look forward to seeing a more comedic side of these characters than our respective shows regularly present. That would be fun — I would like that.”

No word yet on whether the lead actors from either show -  Sleepy Hollow stars Tom Mison & Nicole Beharie or Supernatural stars Jensen Ackles & Jared Padalecki - will make an appearance in the spin-off. An earlier announcement about the hybrid series on The Huffington Post hinted at the involvement of legendary actor William Shatner in a supporting role, although calls to his representatives have not been returned.

That’s some pretty shoddy journalism from a reporter named…
(checks byline)
Orlando Jones…which totally sounds like a made up name.
Irving couldn’t have been convicted because there hasn’t even been a trial yet FFS.
And I’m willing to bet you that the opportunist who made these shirts to “support” the cap’n isn’t even donating proceeds to Frank’s defense.
I just…
http://mxtees.co/freefrank

That’s some pretty shoddy journalism from a reporter named…

(checks byline)

Orlando Jones…which totally sounds like a made up name.

Irving couldn’t have been convicted because there hasn’t even been a trial yet FFS.

And I’m willing to bet you that the opportunist who made these shirts to “support” the cap’n isn’t even donating proceeds to Frank’s defense.

I just…

http://mxtees.co/freefrank